Home > Personal, Sport > The “Myths of Cricket”

The “Myths of Cricket”

For all those who have sat down to a broadcast of a game of cricket, you would have at some point or another been exposed to what I like to call the “Myths Of Cricket”. These in reality are simply comments or ideas that commentators and the media have instilled in the viewers of the game. Below are the top six myths (I chose six to change it up from the traditional 10 or 5) as I see them.

6. “20/20 cricket is the new format that is being rapidly accepted by all those in the cricketing world”. This is a false assumption on the part of many people. while the format has brought about some exciting match-ups it has been unable to truly challenge test cricket. While many people use the example of its popularity in India, we should remember that Indians are not fans of test cricket. Prior to T20s One Day Cricket was their favourite, this is true for the entire sub-continent. Back in England, Australia or South Africa Test Cricket continues to prove that is the pinnacle sport with sellout crowds turning up at every game (take a look at the ongoing West Indies-England series).

5. “Left handers are the more stylish batsmen”. Another false theory; Sachin Tendulkar, Ricky Ponting and Rahul Dravid. All three of those players are not only the best in the business, but also the most stylish to watch. On the other hand; Shiv Chanderpaul, Simon Katich and Graeme Smith are all highly accomplished left handers, but you would not want youngster mirroring them when batting

4. “A spinner needs variations”. The verdict on this argument has not come in yet, but personally I disagree with this theory. Graeme Swann (and to a lesser extent Nathan Lyon) have proven that a spinner with an orthodox delivery and good control is capable of being a match-winner. In fact Muralithan, prior to the introduction of his doosara, was considered a more lethal bowler. In this case less mean more.

3. “Fast bowlers do not make good fielders”. Ten years ago this comment would not have drawn a second glance, however, in today’s modern game more and more fast bowlers are doubling as excellent fielders. Jame Anderson for England is one such example, in fact his safe hands often see him employed in the gully or slip region. Brett Lee of Australia is another example of a fielder who is a brilliant catcher with a rocket arm.

2. “Tailenders coming out and slogging is entertaining”. This is by far one of the worst told lies I continue to hear from commentators. Gone are the days when cricketers could get away with throwing their wicket away. Muralitharan was one such player who never put any effort into his batting and more often than not swung wildly across the line. Today, apart from the iconic Christ Martin, no team possess what you would call a traditional number eleven. That being all eleven players are capable of holding a bat and contributing in way or another. In fact solid defending and grafting of runs by the tailenders are far more satisfying for the supporters, seeing a tailender play a loose shot often brings about a groan of frustration.

1. “Cricket is a batsman’s game”. This, in my view, is a blatant lie and one which must be called out every time it is mentioned. Yes the spectators love to see centuries and boundaries hit, but it is wickets that will draw a crowd to its feet, and it is wickets that will reignite a lazy Sunday at a test match. A game could be dragging on with the batsmen dominating the bowlers, when suddenly that elusive wicket comes about, the crowd is drawn to its feet and all eleven players converging on the bowler in celebrations. Low scoring games dominated by bowlers have more often than not produced a far more exciting contest than one which is dominated by the bat.

Wickets bring both the players and crowds to their feet faster than runs” 

Advertisements
  1. No comments yet.
  1. No trackbacks yet.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: